Sunday, July 17, 2016

From the Developer’s Toolbox: Highlights from the Ex Libris Developer Network



For our second edition of From the Developer’s Toolbox, where you can read about innovative ideas from Ex Libris customers and our own R&D team, we take a look at how the University of Liege is leveraging Alma and Primo to provide new services at the library and overcoming librarian resistance. We also feature two examples of how the Alma APIs can be a powerful tool for developers. And we end with a quick review marking the second anniversary of the Ex Libris Developer Network.

Digitization Requests at the University of Liege Library
An Ex Libris customer, the University of Liege, describes two ways in which the university library has been better serving its patrons with newly developed services in both Alma and Primo. The post does not gloss over some concerns voiced by librarians in response to the introduction of the new services, but also shows how those concerns will likely be resolved. Read more here >>>

Working with the Alma Jobs API
Tamar Fuches, a member of the Ex Libris Alma API team, explains how the Alma July 2016 release gives developers greater flexibility in defining and reviewing sets of actions to be applied to a pre-defined set of records. It is now possible to submit and view the results of such actions (known as manual jobs) using the Alma API. Read how here >>>

Ex Libris’ Josh Weisman explains how Primo and Alma work together to allow libraries to expose specific collections to patrons in external applications, such as a university or library portal or a custom special exhibit landing page. Weisman details how to use the Alma collection APIs to do so. Read more here >>>

At the end of the second year since the launch of the Ex Libris Developer Network, we're happy to share a short summary of some milestones and successes. These include: growing collaborative activity in the network; just as many blog entries by our customers as by our staff; and record usage of the Alma API. As Josh Weisman writes, this is a “testament to the creativity and ingenuity of the Alma developer community.” Read it all here >>>

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